Mirror Image

Mostly AR and Stuff

“get nan or inf error” in cuda-convnet – possible fix

“get nan or inf” error happens sometimes on lower-end GPU’s in cuda-convnet. I have traced this error to NaN values in the weights of convolutional layers. I still not clear to me why these NaN values appear in the weights. Are they backpropagate from fully-connected layers or popping up in the convolution kernel? It looks to me latter is more likely. Anyway I made a temporary fix – just scan weight’s gradients with simple cuda kernel and replace NaN’a with zeroes. Didn’t observe the error after that.

I have pushed fix into windows version of cuda-convnet at

https://github.com/s271/win_convnet

Fix activated with option –fix-nan=1

There shouldn’t be any problem with making those changes for linux version – there are several small changes in  *.cu and *.py files only

PS

If anyone wondering what cuda-convnet is here is a nice explanation:

http://fastml.com/object-recognition-in-images-with-cuda-convnet/

And here is the main paper about cuda-convnet

http://books.nips.cc/papers/files/nips25/NIPS2012_0534.pdf

 

Advertisements

17, January, 2014 Posted by | Coding | , , , | 3 Comments

ConvNet for windows

I have seen an excellent wlakthrough on building Alex Krizhevsky’s cuda-convnet for windows, but difference in configuration and installed packages could be tiresome. So here is complete build of convnet for windows 64:

https://github.com/s271/win_convnet

It require having CUDA compute capability 2.0 or better GPU of cause, Windows 64bit, Visual Studio 64bits and Python 64bit with NumPy installed. The rest of libs and dlls are precomplied. In building it I’ve followed instructions by Yalong Bai (Wyvernbai) from http://www.asiteof.me/archives/50.

Read Readme.md before installation – you may (or may not) require PYTHONPATH environmental variable set.

On side note I’ve used WinPython for both libraries and running the package. WinPython seems a very nice package, which include Spyder IDE. I have some problems with Spyder though – sometimes it behave erratically during debugging/running the code. Could be my inexperience with Spyder though. Another nice package – PythonXY – regretfully can not be used – it has only 32 bit version and will not compile with/run 64 bit modules.

24, October, 2013 Posted by | Coding, Uncategorized | , , , , , , , | Comments Off on ConvNet for windows

CUDA gamification experiment

This demo was inspired by Escapist article “I hate magic” by Robert Rath ( http://www.escapistmagazine.com/artic… ) and “continuous game of life” (http://arxiv.org/abs/1111.1567 ) by Stephan Rafler
This is attempt to show how GPGPU could be used to model magic as different physics.
The demo run at 70 fps at laptop with GF GTX 670M. With some tradeoffs it can be made run much faster
require CUDA GPGPU with at least 2.0 Cuda compute capability (practically all modern cards, GF GTX 550 or better)
Source code:
https://github.com/s271/cuMagic/

29, September, 2013 Posted by | Coding, Demo, Games, GPGPU | , , , | Comments Off on CUDA gamification experiment

Deleting files which couldn’t be deleted by Administrator in Win 7

If you are an unfortunate person who have to use Windows 7 a lot (like me) undeletable files happen to you from time to time. It could be result of disk failure, or interrupted boot, or just for no reason at all.
The problem is, sometimes they can’t be deleted even by Administrator. To fix this Administrator have have to “take ownership” of the file in question.
It goes like this:
1. run from the command line
chkdsk /f
This step is necessary because file permissions could be corrupted
2. login as Administrator.
3. from the command line
takeown /f full_directory_and_path_name
4. from the command line
icacls full_directory_and_path_name /GRANT ADMINISTRATORS:F
5.Now Administrator can delete file. If even that is not helping you can try delete from Safe mode.

1, March, 2012 Posted by | Coding | Comments Off on Deleting files which couldn’t be deleted by Administrator in Win 7

Samsung SARI 1.5 Augmented Reality SDK is out in the wild

Something I did for Samsung (kernel of tracker). Biggest improvement in SARI 1.5 is the sensors fusion, which allow for a lot more robust tracking.
Here is example of run-time localization and mapping with SARI 1.5:

This is the AR EdiBear game (free in Samsung apps store)

14, November, 2011 Posted by | Augmented Reality, Coding AR, computer vision, Demo, Games, mobile games | , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

SMMT is now open sourced

SMMT is now open sourced under BSD-like license. Sourceforge page is here.

21, February, 2010 Posted by | Coding AR | , , , , , | 4 Comments

Visualizing Bundle Adjustment

One of the problem with bundle adjustment is multiple local minimums. If initial approximation is not good enough solution could converge to wrong minima. If this problem arise global optimization should be used. There are several branch and bound bundle adjustment methods for it, which use fractional programming.
Though it’s usually possible to choose correct minima with some geometric consistency check or additional information, I’m trying to understand this situation better. I’ve tried to visualize reprojection error distribution for 2-frame bundle adjustment.
Those pictures represent dependence of reprojection error on the values of second camera position and rotation relatively to first camera.
First, it’s interesting to see how minimal error depend on translational parameter, with fixed rotational parameters. Here 3d structure factored out and translation parametrized with first frame epipole position. Here we see reprojection error depending on the epipole of the first frame only.

This picture easy to understand. “Turbulent” area in the center – the situation where epipole is close to projections of the points. Black tails – area where solution – epipole which minimize reprojection error are situated. It could be seen that epipole have “preferred” direction – the direction from the coordinate center to epipole is more important than distance from center to epipole. There are to “tails” because epipole pass through infinity. This picture also shows that coordinate descent could be effective for factoring out translation, with descent first by direction and second by distance. This wouldn’t work if epipole is near center. The situation where epipole is near center correspond translation of the second camera by mostly Z-axis , but in that case bundle adjustment is not robust anyway.

Now to more complicated problem – visualizing reprojection error parametrized with rotational parametres. 3D structure is factored out as in the first example , and using insight we got in the first example translation parameter approximately factored out with coordinate descent. Two rotational parameters are correspond to projection of the normal to the camera plane of the second camera on the first camera plane. Third parameter (rotation around that normal) is fixed with initial approximation.

Here we see some edgelike artifacts caused by imperfect factoring out translation.
It really should be more smooth, something like that – in this picture epipole distance from the center fixed in infinity. That make picture more smooth but less correct.

Returning to the first rotational parameter example – green pixels mark local minima of the approximation, blue and light blue circles mark two minima to which bundle adjustment actually converge. They dont’ fit approximation exactly, due to error of factoring out epiploes.
What can we see that picture? The local minimums are situated inside connected areas, which generally can be represented as ellipses only poorly (one area is more like spiral). That explain why quadratic methods(Gauss–Newton, Levenberg–Marquardt) are not always work efficiently for bundle adjustment.
The interesting thing is that all area approximately connect in some kind of X-shaped center, where reprojection error locally maximal. I have seen this behavior on other examples too. Right now I don’t understand completely why it happens and what is the nature of this “center”. If this is universal property and this “center” can be efficiently located that effect could be useful.
With multiple frame bundle adjustment situation could be different, but it’s a lot more difficult both to visualize and calculate.
Here are original camera frames, on which bundle adjustment is executed.

20, February, 2010 Posted by | Coding AR | , , , | 2 Comments

Symbian Multimarker Tracking Library updated

Symbian Multimarker Tracking Library updated to v0.5. Some bugs fixed, markers can be moved run-time now. Download is here

24, January, 2010 Posted by | Coding AR | , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Symbian Multimarker Tracking Library updated

More bundle adjustment

Here is some more narrow baseline local bundle adjustment, from only two camera frames.

Outlier is drawn in red. Some points are not detected as outliers, but still are not localized properly.
Multiscale FAST used for detection. No descriptors were used for point correspondence, instead incremental tracking with search in sliding window by average gradient responses was used(there are three tracked frames between those two). I think those bad points could possibly be isolated with some geometric consistency rules, presuming landscape is smooth.

6, January, 2010 Posted by | Coding AR | , , , , , , | Comments Off on More bundle adjustment

Features matching and geometric consistency.

Here I want to talk about matching in image registration. We are doing registration in 3D or 2D, and using feature points for that. Next stage after extraction of feature points from the image is finding corresponding points in two(or more) images. Usually it’s done with descriptors, like SIFT, SURF, DAISY etc. Sometimes randomized trees are used for it. Whatever methods is used it usually has around .5% of false positives. False positives create outliers in registration algorithm. That is not a big problem in planar trackers or model/marker trackers. It could be a problem for Structure From Motion though. If CPU power is not limited the problem is not very serious. Heavy-duty algorithms like full-sequence bundle adjustment and RANSAC cope with outliers pretty well. However even for high-end mobile phones such algorithms are problematic. Some tricks can help – Georg Klein put full-sequence bundle adjustment into separate thread on PTAM tracker to run asynchronously, but I’m trying to do local, 2-4 frames bundle adjustment here. The problem of false positives is especially difficult for images of patterned environment, where some image parts are similar or repeated.
Here mismatched correspondence marked with blue line (points 15-28).

As you can see it’s not easy for any descriptor to tell the difference between points 13(correct) and 15(wrong) on the left image – their neighborhood is practically the same:


Such situations could easily happen not only indoor, but also in cityscape, industrial, and others regular environments.
One solution for such cases is to increase descriptor radius, to process a bigger patch around the point, but that would create problems of its own, for example too much false negatives.
Other approach is to use geometric consistency of the image points positions.
There are at least two ways to do it.
One is to consider displacements of corresponding points between frames. Here is example from paper by Kanazawa et al “Robast Image Matching Preserving Global Geometric Consistency”

This method first gathering local displacement statistic around each points, filter out outliers and and apply smoothing filter. Here are original matches, matches after applying consistency check and matches after applying smoothing filter.

However this method works best for dense, regular sets of feature points. For small, sparse set of points it does not improving situation much.
Here is a second approach. Build graph out of feature points for each frame.

Local topological structure of the two graphs is different because of false positives. It’s easy to find graph vertices/edges which cause inconsistency – edges marked blue.They can be found for example by signs of crossproducts between edges. After offending vertices found they are removed:

There are different ways to build graph out of feature points. Simplest is nearest neighbors, but may be Delaney triangulation or DSP can do better.

11, December, 2009 Posted by | Coding AR, computer vision | , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments